J, E, D, P, and Me: Some Thoughts on the Documentary Hypothesis

You can see where this is going . . .  David Bokovoy will soon be releasing the first volume of his three-volume series Authoring the Old Testament. In this series, Bokovoy will, among other things, present and argue for the Documentary Hypothesis (DH) to an LDS audience. He will not only discuss what the DH … Read more

A Lamanite is a Lamanite, of Course, of Course

Joseph Smith Preaching to the Indians (1890) by William Armitage. Some of the responses to the Church’s recent essay on DNA and the Book of Mormon have been rather perplexing. (The responses of certain prominent critics of the Church, who shall, for their sakes, remain nameless, were downright embarrassing.) One of the responses I’ve heard … Read more

Book of Mormon Minimalists and the NHM Inscriptions: A Response to Dan Vogel

One of the NHM altar inscriptions.  As promised, here is my article (co-written with my good friend Neal Rappleye) responding to Dan Vogel’s arguments against the significance of the NHM altar inscriptions for the Book of Mormon’s historicity. The article can accessed online here. If nothing else, the article will probably serve as a good … Read more

Archaic Hebrew in the Old Testament (And What It Means for the Book of Mormon)

One of the Lachish ostraca (7th century BCE), written in paleo-Hebrew script. Some time ago I posted a blog entry at Interpreter on the atheist polemicist Richard Dawkins’ argument that the Book of Mormon is a fraud because Joseph Smith rendered his translation into Jacobean English. Dawkins’ argument is (and I’m not making this up) … Read more

Some Thoughts on Literary Borrowing

John H. Walton From the evangelical biblical scholar John H. Walton. When comparative study is carried out at this conceptual or cognitive level, some adjustments in methodology need to be made. When literary pieces are being compared to consider the question of dependency among them, the burden of proof has been on the researcher to … Read more